Ukraine Trade and Investment Portal http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com Online export web-based tool about UA companies Wed, 05 Dec 2018 05:11:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 HOW TO SELL ORGANICS TO CANADA http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/how-to-sell-organics-to-canada/ http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/how-to-sell-organics-to-canada/#respond Wed, 05 Dec 2018 05:11:58 +0000 http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/?p=8471 In August, a year has elapsed since the conclusion of the Free Trade Agreement with Canada. Among other things, this offers great opportunities for exporting organic products.

It is most expedient to export organic processed products to Canada, while paying attention to territorial features, national standards, as well as tariff and non-tariff restrictions.

Canadian organic goods market is the fifth largest in the world. It is outweighed by China and France. And yet, it is also geographically close to the leader in the consumption of organics in the world – the United States. As to the cost volume of the Canadian organic market, it is worth EUR 3 billion. This is an interesting market opportunity. With regard to the volume of consumption, statistics show that people living in these two countries spend most money on organic products per year. For the US market, it is €121 per year, and Canada is slightly less than €83 per person annually.

As of 2017, the sales of organic products in Canada amounted to 4.2 million CAD. Interestingly, organic foods and drinks constitute the bulk of this market – about 90%. In particular, these are fresh vegetables and fruits (40%), beverages (13%), dairy products, eggs (12%), cereals, pasta, bread (9%). Despite the fact that the country is a powerful producer of organic products itself, its output is not enough. As of 2016, for example, 0.2 million tons of organic products were imported for the total of 637 million CAD. This is much more than produced within the country, which means a shortage and a market opportunity for Ukrainian producers. Of course, the Canadian government is trying to motivate domestic production: in 2017, the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and British Columbia launched significant farmer support programs, so the gap between supply and demand will gradually decrease over time. It is now quite a good time, however, to start exporting to this market.

Quite interestingly, Canada has become one of the first countries to track organic exports and imports. In particular, imports are tracked by 65 categories in a specialized system, while exports are represented in 18 categories. If you look at the imports statistics for the TOP-20 positions, organic coffee, bananas, strawberries, green salads, tomatoes and tomato paste, etc. are the most popular organic products.

Useful statistics are provided by the Canada Organic Trade Association (COTA) concerning a typical organic purchaser in Canada in order to direct producers towards their consumers, which can be both male and female (traditional purchases are usually made by both spouses), of a younger age (18-34 years old), a city dweller, with the greatest interest in organic produce among residents of British Columbia or Alberta. However, these provinces are not the most populated, and Quebec and Ontario should not be disregarded. There is also correlation between the level of income, education and activity in the organic market: people with higher earnings, therefore, are more aware of the details of organic products and more willing to pay for them. Also, families with children are more inclined to spend money on organic products, so organic food and goods for children is a very promising niche as well.

Regarding the regulation of the Canadian organic market, it also significantly differs from the Ukrainian and European approaches. Canada has national organic standards. As of today, the industry is guided by Canada Organic Regulations adopted in 2009. More detailed requirements for the manufacture and the list of permitted substances are provided by CAN/CGSB 32.310-2015 standards – Organic Production Systems – General Management Principles and Standards, CAN/CGSB 32.311-2015 – Organic Production Systems – List of Permitted Substances. However, Canada goes today through an active phase of deregulation; in June, a new regulatory act was published which combines more than 10 legislative acts and is called Regulation on Safe Food for Canadians. Likewise, it deals with organic products. A review of the above standards is scheduled for 2020. Therefore, it is important for organic producers to keep abreast, since the situation is changing quite dynamically. Certified organic products sold in Canada must bear the Canada Organic logo.

A separate topic is sanitary and phytosanitary regulations. If you use the “organic” prefix for the product, this does not mean a complete grace as a series of stringent requirements is applied anyway. Interestingly enough, the requirements for a particular food product in Canada can be traced back to the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS), which is something like the well-known European Export Help Desk.

With regard to the harmonization of certain sanitary and phytosanitary regulations and certificates, the wheel has set to motion only concerning chicken meat. For all other categories of quarantinable goods (such as beef, pork, eggs), the problems remain. Accordingly, if the business begins to demonstrate interest in the Canadian market the process will begin to harmonize those certificates between the governing bodies. Also, the ban on import of Ukrainian grain and wheat into Canada continues, because pests were found in the imports of one of the corn suppliers, and a precautionary measure was immediately taken. Therefore, there is a need for additional communication of state authorities to make this ban lifted.

With regard to dairy products, the principle of protection of domestic producers is applied, and there is a high import tariff for imported goods. Therefore, the opportunities for Ukrainian producers including organic manufacturers are limited in this segment. On the one hand, it would seem that with such a list of restrictions is not worth trying to supply to this market. Those looking for opportunities, however, will necessarily find them. Although Canada is far, for supplying the processed goods even logistics will not be a financial constraint. Moreover, there are significantly lower requirements for processed goods. Therefore, it is logical to recommend manufacturers of processed organic products to commence sales on this market. The most popular products are juices, confectionery products, dried and frozen vegetables, sauces, ketchup, vegetable oils and snacks.

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UKRAINE AND CANADA HAVE DEVELOPED COOPERATION IN STANDARDIZATION http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/ukraine-and-canada-have-developed-cooperation-in-standardization/ http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/ukraine-and-canada-have-developed-cooperation-in-standardization/#respond Tue, 04 Dec 2018 16:23:25 +0000 http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/?p=8466 We have another great news! On September 25, 2018, the UkrNDNC (State Enterprise “Ukrainian Research and Training Center for Standardization, Certification and Quality”) and the Standards Council of Canada signed an agreement on cooperation.

The agreement was signed during the ISO Week in Geneva (Switzerland). It is the result of previous agreements reached during the visit of the Ukrainian delegation to Canada in November last year. The trip of the Ukrainian delegation was supported by the CUTIS project.

The Standards Council of Canada accredits standardization organizations and compliance assessment bodies. It has accredited 10 standard development organizations in Canada.

The signed agreement includes, inter alia, the following important points:

  • Exchange of information related to standards development activities
  • Exchange of experience and the best practices of the activities of national technical standardization committees
  • Cooperation in the development and adoption of international standards
  • Exchange requests for information on the adoption of international standards in Canada and Ukraine
  • Sectoral cooperation in the field of international standardization and free trade

In summer 2018, the UkrNDNC also signed a memorandum of understanding with the Canadian Standards Association (CSA Group), which is a non-governmental standardization and certification body accredited by the Standards Council of Canada.

Cooperation between the UkrNDNC and the Standards Council of Canada will support the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and Ukraine (CUFTA), which entered into force on August 2017.

It is not a secret that after the abolition of tariff barriers, it is the non-tariff requirements that are sometimes rather difficult to overcome. Accordingly, the compliance of Ukrainian products with the regulatory requirements of the Canadian market becomes the key issue for exporters.

More about standardization in Canada you can find here.

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WHAT SURPRISES UKRAINIAN FOOD EXPORTERS TO CANADA SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR? http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/what-surprises-ukrainian-food-exporters-to-canada-should-be-prepared-for/ http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/what-surprises-ukrainian-food-exporters-to-canada-should-be-prepared-for/#respond Tue, 04 Dec 2018 16:14:12 +0000 http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/?p=8462 The Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA), which entered into force in summer of 2017, may potentially open a wide range of opportunities for Ukrainian exports. Now, there is just a little left to do – to take advantage of these opportunities.

Taking into account the fact that Canada, as well as Ukraine, is an export-oriented country, the issue of veterinary and phytosanitary control of imports is a serious challenge.

Canadians strictly control agricultural products crossing their borders, since the importation of a product contaminated by plant pests or pathogens compromises Canada’s own export potential and undermines safety of its citizens.

The Way to Canada

Safety guarantee of the imported goods in Canada has to be supported by:

1) phytosanitary certificate (for products of plant origin that are subject to quarantine);

2) veterinary certificate (for products of animal origin) issued by the competent authority of the exporting country.

The central authority that establishes veterinary and phytosanitary regulations for Canadian manufacturers and importers at the federal level is the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. This is essentially an equivalent of the Ukrainian State Service for Food Safety and Consumer Protection (SSUFSCP).

How does it work in practice? For instance, Ukrainian beef producer sees good prospects for selling its products in Canada. But for the importation to the Canadian territory the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) requires that the products have veterinary certificates.

The producer itself or together with the representatives of the respective association of producers approaches the SSUFSCP asking it to initiate the procedure for the approval of veterinary certificates for beef with the Canadian regulatory authority.

In line with the current Canadian official procedure, the Ukrainian party has to provide comprehensive information (questionnaire responses) regarding the legal framework, the competent authority network, the existing state control system and procedures, statistics in Ukraine, etc. Once the Canadian party has processed the information provided to it, the SSUFSCP and the concerned exporters undergo an audit by the Canadian regulatory authority.

Only upon the receipt of positive audit findings and approval of the veterinary certificate form for a specific product category, the SSUFSCP will be given permission to export the appropriate type of product.

It is worth noting that this procedure will not occur automatically, but should be initiated by the concerned Ukrainian producers.

It should also be understood that elimination of these barriers takes time, sometimes years.

Phytosanitary and Veterinary Certificates Approval Procedures

  1. Producer or association of producers sees good prospects for its products in the Canadian market and approaches the SSUFSCP.
  2. The SSUFSCP approaches the appropriate Canadian regulatory authorities and initiates the procedure of certificate approval.
  3. The Ukrainian party provides the Canadian party with all appropriate information on the product safety control in Ukraine.
  4. The Canadian regulatory authority conducts audits of the SSUFSCP and the concerned exporters.
  5. If the audit has been successfully passed, the SSUFSCP is entitled to issue appropriate certificates that are recognized in Canada.

The procedure for recognizing the control system as described above is applicable to both Ukrainian exports to Canada and Canadian imports to Ukraine. Presently, competent Ukrainian and Canadian authorities have approved 15 international veterinary certificates for importing to Ukraine.

Who is Next?

However, Ukraine’s trade potential with Canada is much higher. In Ukraine, there is a strong interest in exports of poultry, packages of bees (i.e. live bees) and confectionery and other products to the Canadian market.

Efforts to open the Canadian market for Ukrainian chicken meat continue. In October 2016, the SSUFSCP submitted to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency under the Canadian Ministry of Agriculture and Food three requests for the accreditation of Ukraine to export poultry and poultry products to Canada. While in April 2017, an additional request was sent for the assessment of Ukraine’s status with regard to the export of bee packages to Canada. So far, the only response including additional questions and clarifications that has been received is the one related to the poultry meat. It is currently being processed by the SSUFSCP experts.

The Ukrainian dairy product producers’ will benefit from learning more about the Supply Management System that operates in Canada. This system is based on monitoring the dairy product consumption and a milk quota system for the Canadian farmers.

Canadians strive to satisfy the demand by the local dairy products to the extent possible. Insufficient amounts of these products are compensated through import quotas. Thus, even regardless of sanitary restrictions, market opportunities for dairy products in Canada are very limited.

Communication with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has revealed that, currently, a ban has been put on the Ukrainian cereals imports to Canada. This is due to the fact that a few years ago, pests were found in one of the lots of imported Ukrainian cereals, although appropriate phytosanitary certificate had been provided.

The lifting of the ban requires additional communication between the relevant authorities of both countries. It is worth noting that the SSUFSCP has not received any requests to resolve this issue from Ukrainian exporters.

Things You Need to Know

Systematically organized information on the documents required to import food products to Canada can be found in the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s website.

It is important to remember that in Canada it is the importer who is responsible for the compliance of the imported products with the local legislation. To this end, a Market Access Secretariat has been established under the Canadian Ministry of Agriculture and Food, which through an ‘open window’ service operating as a publicly accessible e-mail server processes inquiries from Canadian businesses and provides recommendations on ways to access both the domestic and foreign markets.

It is also important that in the second half of 2018 legislative changes will come into effect in Canada that will change the approach to food safety control. These will be based on the risk analysis principle and the need for importers to obtain import licenses for the controlled shipments in the future.

Ukrainian exporters already now need to pay attention to the new Canadian preventive food safety controls.

The implementation of the Free Trade Agreement requires a systematic cooperation between Ukrainian and Canadian government authorities, which has become more active now. In November 2017, with the support of the Canada-Ukraine Trade and Investment Support Project the SSUFSCP delegation visited Canada and established important contacts with local regulatory authorities.

We are sure that in 2018 our joint efforts will make the Canadian market closer to Ukrainian food exporters.

Authors:

Boris Kobal, Director, Food Safety and Veterinary Service Department, State Service of Ukraine for Food Safety and Consumer Protection

Olena Kuryata, Chief of Unit for Foreign Relations and European Integration Deputy Chief of Directorate for International Cooperation State Service of Ukraine on Food Safety and Consumer Protection

Source: European Pravda

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STANDARDS IN CANADA: HOW TO OVERCOME BARRIERS AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE FREE TRADE AGREEMENT http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/standards-in-canada-how-to-overcome-barriers-and-take-advantage-of-the-free-trade-agreement/ http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/standards-in-canada-how-to-overcome-barriers-and-take-advantage-of-the-free-trade-agreement/#respond Tue, 04 Dec 2018 15:50:41 +0000 http://ukraine-trade-and-investment-portal.com/?p=8457 It will soon be six months since the free trade regime came into force between Ukraine and Canada. How can Ukrainian exporters leverage the regime to get the highest possible advantage?

It is not a secret that after the abolition of tariff barriers, it is the non-tariff requirements that are sometimes rather difficult to overcome. Accordingly, the compliance of Ukrainian products with the regulatory requirements of the Canadian market becomes the key issue for exporters.

It is known that requirements for goods are usually issued in the form of standards and technical regulations. The former is voluntary, while the latter is mandatory to comply with. However, in Canada, one will not find such a clear division.

The standards in Canada can be conventionally divided into:

  1. Standards developed by standardization bodies;
  2. National standards;
  3. “Obligatory” standards. Right, don’t be surprised, I mean the obligatory standards

Now, let’s take a detailed look. In Canada, nine organizations have an accreditation of the Standards Council of Canada to develop standards.

It is important that the Standards Council of Canada does not develop any standards. It accredits standardization organizations and compliance assessment bodies. However, the Council has the right to approve the standards as national standards of Canada (which, however, remain voluntary). There are currently around 3 thousand of such national standards.

Although the standardization organizations in Canada compete with each other, they have a certain specialization.

For example, Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) is traditionally specialized in developing standards for public procurement, organic products, office equipment, fireproofing of textile products, etc. It was CGSB that developed the standard for Canada’s national flag.

This organization, by the way, has existed since 1934, and works based on the principles of self-sustainability without receiving any state funding.

Importantly, it is currently the only one of the nine Canadian standardization organizations whose standards can be obtained for free.

Canadian Standardization Association (CSA Group) is another influential Canadian standardization organization specializing in products like electrical appliances, construction materials, vehicles, etc. For example, CSA is the author of the Canadian Electrical Code – a collective name for the standards that set requirements for underground and terrestrial electricity distribution networks, street lighting, household appliances, etc.”

Standards become obligatory when they are referenced in Regulations of Canada.

The Regulations of Canada are somewhat similar in nature to by-laws in Ukraine – they detail and supplement the provisions of Laws (in Canada – Acts). For example, in addition to the Consumer Product Safety Act, about 35 Regulations were adopted.

Public authorities in Canada increasingly use standards when drafting Regulations – the standards (or their parts) are incorporated into Regulations and thus become mandatory.

According to recent estimates, there are references to approximately 1,000 standards in the Regulations at the federal level. Hundreds of standards are referenced in provincial-level Regulations.

As for the compliance assessment bodies, there are more than 400 of them in Canada. They are also accredited by the Standards Council of Canada.

What does this mean for a Ukrainian exporter in practice?

The key question is “How to find out what requirements are put forward to your product?” The best way is to get in touch with a regulatory authority in Canada. Believe it or not, but this recommendation came from the Canadian regulatory authorities themselves. Our experience shows that requests are taken seriously and responses are sent by the authority within one to two weeks (depending on complexity of the request).

For example, medical equipment, toys, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, radiation equipment are managed by Health Canada. Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada is engaged in management of telecommunication equipment, and Transport Canada deals with vehicles and tires.

In addition, attention should also be paid to provincial-level requirements that may differ from those of the federal level.

For example, the requirements for electrical appliances are contained in the Canadian Electrical Code developed by the CSA and adopted at the federal and provincial levels (in ten provinces and three territories of Canada). However, there are additional requirements in Ontario (so-called “deviations”) outlined in the Ontario Electrical Safety Code.

Taking into account the existence of the Free Trade Agreement between Ukraine and Canada, many producers consider Canada as a hub for exports to North America or as a starting point for exports to the United States. In terms of technical regulation, this approach may be fully justified as many US and Canadian standards are harmonized or developed jointly.

Thus, CSA has the accreditation of the American National Standards Institute, and the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada.

Finally, it is worth remembering the famous phrase: where there is a will there is a way.

There are many more ways to export to Canada than reasons to be afraid of the Canadian standards. So, feel free to contact Canadian regulatory authorities, bring your products to the level of Canadian standards and expand your business horizons.

Author: Oleksandra Brovko, CUTIS Senior Trade and Investment policy expert

Source: European Pravda

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